Lakeland News - Lakeland College http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News Sat, 28 May 2016 09:26:16 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-us Chad Harbach - 2014 Community Book Read http://lakeland.edu/Events/harbach-leads-first-lakeland-community-book-read http://lakeland.edu/Events/harbach-leads-first-lakeland-community-book-read

Lakeland College hosted its inaugural Community Book Read on April 15, 2014 with Wisconsin native Chad Harbach, author of the best-selling novel "The Art of Fielding." Harbach met with students for a Q&A earlier in the day. The evening event featured Harbach reading excerpts from the novel and answering questions about the work and his life as an author and magazine editor. "The Art of Fielding," Harbach's debut novel, was named one of the New York Times' Ten Best Books of 2011.

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larosees [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Eric LaRose) Featured Events Fri, 18 Apr 2014 09:47:57 -0500
Lakeland mourns passing of former President Richard Hill http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/lakeland-mourns-passing-of-former-president-richard-hill http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/lakeland-mourns-passing-of-former-president-richard-hill

Richard Hill, Lakeland College's 12th president, passed away Wednesday night in Florida. He was 87.

Services will be held in Florida and Wisconsin. Burial will take place at Immanuel United Church of Christ on June 2 in a private ceremony. A public celebration of Hill's life will be held at the Ley Chapel on the Lakeland campus at 1:30 p.m. on June 2.

Hill led Lakeland from 1977-89, a time that saw significant growth both physically and financially. The Todd Wehr Physical Education Center (1984), Bradley Fine Arts Building (1987) and the Verhulst Center for the Arts (1988) were all constructed during his tenure, and the library received a significant addition and was named for former trustee John Esch.

During his Lakeland presidency, Hill served on several local boards, and also was president of the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

After leaving the presidency, Hill served as Lakeland's only chancellor from 1989-91 during the early years of the presidency of David Black. Hill was named president emeritus by the board of trustees upon his retirement, and in 1994, the trustees named two new apartments for Hill and former Lakeland President John Morland.

Hill received honorary doctorates from Lakeland and Carroll College (his undergraduate alma mater), and an endowed Lakeland scholarship in his name was created at the time of his retirement.

After leaving Wisconsin, Hill and his wife, Marilyn, often hosted Lakeland visitors at their home in Florida and were regular attendees at Lakeland’s annual Florida alumni gathering.

The early years of Hill's presidency saw the establishment of the Lifelong Learning Program, the state's first degree-completion program for working adults. Today, the Evening, Weekend and Online program has more than 2,000 students. Another highlight of the Hill presidency came in 1978, when the science center, which was dedicated in 1968, was named for former trustee Lucius Chase.

The Bradley was dedicated on Oct. 18, 1987, on a night that included a performance by the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and the Bradley Gallery's first exhibit. The campaign to build the Bradley Building included a $500,000 gift from Lloyd and Jane Pettit, at the time one of the largest contributions in Lakeland's history.

The completion of the Wehr Center ushered in the modern era of Lakeland athletics, giving the Muskies a state-of-the-art facility which was expanded in 2005, and the completion of both the Verhulst Center and the Bradley signaled Lakeland's strong commitment to the fine arts.

Prior to serving at Lakeland, Hill was president of Huron College in South Dakota and assistant to the president and other roles at Carroll College. He received a master of divinity degree from McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, was an ordained Presbyterian minister and served churches in Wisconsin and Illinois.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Thu, 19 May 2016 14:51:21 -0500
West Foundation grant will help Lakeland expand computer science program http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/west-foundation-grant-will-help-lakeland-expand-computer-science-program http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/west-foundation-grant-will-help-lakeland-expand-computer-science-program

Cindy Lindstrom and a robot

Lakeland College has received a $50,000 grant from the West Foundation in Manitowoc to enhance its computer science program and to fund efforts to increase graduation rates.

A total of $31,200 will fund several new pieces of equipment that students studying computer science can access. With the new equipment, the program will give every computer science student an artificial intelligence programming experience with modern robots, delve into computer forensics and perform hands-on 3D printing with resin.

Lakeland will purchase three new humanoid robots to go with the two it currently has to expand its artificial intelligence program. The new robots will allow for team exercises and open the door to Lakeland students competing in regional or national robotics competitions. The two existing robots have benefitted Lakeland students and hundreds of area high school and middle school students who have visited campus for hands-on computer science experiences.

A portion of the funds will be used to create a forensic computer lab, where students will learn hacking, engage in penetration testing exercises and allow Lakeland to host hackathon competitions.

"The skills necessary to fend off hacker and malware attacks are in high demand in the marketplace, but we cannot teach these skills without appropriately safeguarded systems," said Cindy Lindstrom, assistant professor of computer science. "This lab will allow us to significantly expand this portion of our program."

Students interested in technical design will now have access to a new, state-of-the-art, 3D resin printer, which allows design in unbreakable materials and additional designs.

Previous support from the West Foundation had allowed Lakeland to create a state-of-the-art classroom and a lab with leading-edge technologies, including the first 3D printer and the two robots.

"Last year, every traditional computer science graduate found employment in their field," Lindstrom said. "With the support of the West Foundation, we are earning a reputation as a leading program and provider of quality computer science graduates, and this additional equipment will allow us to do even more. I'm excited for our students and the opportunities we will have for them."

The additional money will also fund a software program, Starfish from Hobsons, which will support Lakeland's student success and retention initiative.

The new software will provide a single communication platform for all student information including alert and intervention status. It will allow for advisors, faculty, staff and student success coaches to monitor students assigned to their classes, monitor student goals, create action plans and coordinate intervention strategies. This platform will be deployed for both traditional and non-traditional Lakeland students, serving nearly 3,000 students in the first year.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Tue, 17 May 2016 09:32:01 -0500
Record crowd enjoys Movers & Shakers Gala http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/record-crowd-enjoys-movers-shakers-gala http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/record-crowd-enjoys-movers-shakers-gala

Father Matthew Widder

A record crowd of more than 650 people gathered for Lakeland College's ninth annual Movers & Shakers Gala on May 14 for a spectacular evening of dancing, multi-course gourmet food, fellowship and philanthropic fundraising.

This year's event, which benefited Lakeland College, marked the return of dancing as eight community leaders and their professional partners were showcased.

The Rev. Matthew Widder, pastor of Holy Name of Jesus and St. Clement parishes, won the Movers & Shakers Gala championship, which goes to the dancer with a combination of the best judges' scores and the most purchased votes. Widder, the last dancer of the night, performed a Texas two-step routine. Widder was sponsored by Friends of Father Matthew Widder.

As a result of Widder's victory, his charity of choice, St. Vincent de Paul Society of Sheboygan, will be the 2017 partner charity and receive $10,000.

The 2017 Movers & Shakers Gala, the 10th anniversary of the event, is set for May 20.

Winning the “Judges' Choice” award was Brooke Van Asten, a territory director at ACUITY, who danced a swing routine. Van Asten was sponsored by ACUITY.

Lakeland's Todd Wehr Center was transformed into a majestic ballroom, which included an elegant dance floor framed by wall-to-wall carpeting, professional lighting and multiple large video screens.

In its previous eight years, Movers & Shakers raised more than $3 million, including a four-year total of $263,500, for more than 30 nonprofit organizations.

All 2016 Gala proceeds will support student scholarships.

Major sponsors of this year's Gala were the Frank G. and Frieda K. Brotz Family Foundation; Sargento Foods, Inc.; Festival Foods; Studio Gear Technology; Zimmermann Printing; and Canopies Events with Distinction. Additional work was provided by Khrome, Blue Moon Studios and Salon Sasé.

The other 2016 dancers included:

  • Sara Brotz, who works in research and development at Plastics Engineering Company, danced a cha-cha and hustle medley routine. Brotz was sponsored by Plastics Engineering Company.
  • Dr. Carolyn Baxter, a board-certified psychiatrist for Prevea, danced an East Coast Swing routine. Baxter was sponsored by Prevea.
  • Barbara Gannon, vice president of corporate communication at Sargento Foods, Inc. and chairperson of the Lakeland Board of Trustees, danced a rumba/cha-cha medley. Gannon was sponsored by Sargento Foods.
  • Lola Roeh, general manager of The Osthoff Resort in Elkhart Lake and a Lakeland graduate, danced a Latin routine. Roeh was sponsored Wisconsin Bank and Trust.
  • Anne Schroeder, founder of Aprivé, danced a swing routine. Schroeder was sponsored by the Grover Family Foundation.
  • Justin Webb, owner of Sun Graphics and founder of the BevCarts app, danced a hip-hop routine. Webb was sponsored by Sun Graphics and BevCarts.

Complete biographies of each dancer are available on the Movers & Shakers website, http://moversandshakersgala.org.

Each celebrity was paired with a professional dancer, and they spent months of training as they competed to win the support of three judges and the sell-out crowd.

Emcees for the evening were Mike Langan and Ike Dyksterhouse. Judges were Sandi Vasatka, Nellie Schmitt and Jenna Roeske.

Photos from this year's event are the Movers & Shakers Gala Facebook page: http://moversandshakersgala.org/facebook.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Mon, 16 May 2016 14:10:27 -0500
Nate Lowe named dean of School of Humanities and Fine Arts http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/nate-lowe-named-dean-of-school-of-humanities-and-fine-arts http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/nate-lowe-named-dean-of-school-of-humanities-and-fine-arts

Lakeland College President Dan Eck today announced the appointment of Nate Lowe as dean of Lakeland University's School of Humanities and Fine Arts, rounding out the institution's new academic leadership team.

As part of the transition to Lakeland University, which begins July 1, the college's existing seven academic divisions will be restructured into three schools – a School of Business & Entrepreneurship; a School of Science, Technology & Education; and a School of Humanities and Fine Arts.

Lowe, a member of Lakeland's faculty since 2007, will lead academic majors within the School of Humanities and Fine Arts and the development of new programming. He will also be responsible for supporting curricular alignment between the traditional and Evening, Weekend and Online delivery models. He will teach two courses annually.

The School of Humanities and Fine Arts will house Lakeland's undergraduate majors and minors in art, broad field social studies, communication, English, history, music, religion, Spanish and writing. Pending approval by the Higher Learning Commission, it will also offer a bachelor of fine arts degree in creative writing.

Lakeland previously announced that Meg Albrinck has been named Lakeland University's provost, Brian Frink will be dean of the School of Science, Technology & Education and Scott Niederjohn will be dean of the School of Business & Entrepreneurship.

All roles are effective Aug. 1.

Lowe currently serves Lakeland as chair of the Creative Arts Division and as associate professor of writing. He has served many administrative roles in the creative arts, interdisciplinary studies and academic assessment. He teaches creative writing, composition, interdisciplinary core and honors courses. In his classes, students are encouraged to share their knowledge, experience and writing with each other, where they find and learn from commonalities and differences.

Lowe's essays have been published in journals such as Ascent, Blood Orange Review, Beecher's Magazine and The Chattahoochee Review, honored with two Pushcart Prize nominations and listed among the year's "notable" in Best American Essays 2007. This May, the Council of Wisconsin Writers will award him an honorable mention for their annual Kay W. Levin Award for Short Nonfiction.

He is currently at work on a book of essays set in the many farm and ranch trucks in which he grew up, witnessed the lives of adults around him and eventually drove for himself.

He received a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from the University of Idaho.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Thu, 12 May 2016 11:25:50 -0500
750-plus earn degrees during Lakeland's 154th commencement http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/750-plus-earn-degrees-during-lakeland-s-154th-commencement http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/750-plus-earn-degrees-during-lakeland-s-154th-commencement

Lakeland College awarded degrees to more than 750 students on Sunday at the college's 154th commencement.

A total of 764 students graduated, including 508 undergraduates and 256 graduate students. Lakeland held separate ceremonies for its graduate and undergraduate students in the Wehr Center fieldhouse on Lakeland's main campus.

It was the final graduation ceremony as Lakeland College, as the institution will become Lakeland University on July 1.

President Dan Eck told the students they join graduates of Mission House College, the institution's name prior to 1956, as important parts of the Lakeland story.

"We will still be the Lakeland you know and love," Eck said. "We will remain connected and honor our history and all of those people that have built this institution and witnessed its evolution from Mission House, to Lakeland College, and forward into the future."

Callie Olson, the winner of the Lakeland's Koehler Campus Senior Award and a double major in nonprofit organization management and religion, challenged her classmates to look up from their portable devices and invest in those around them.

"While I wish for you all to set out and follow your dreams and accomplish the many goals you have set for yourself, I wish even more for you to invest in and have meaningful relationships with others that continuously encourage you and uphold you during your times of need," Olson said. "Always strive to be a blessing to those around you every day, and never lose sight of those individuals who have helped you get to where you are today."

Benjamin M. Salzmann, president and CEO of ACUITY Insurance, delivered the commencement address for the undergraduate ceremony.

In addition to being an employer of dozens of Lakeland graduates, the college and ACUITY are partners in a program at Sheboygan South High School that allows South students to take computer science courses that earn both high school and college credit and creates work-based learning opportunities at ACUITY.

"We have hired more graduates from Lakeland than any other college or university in the nation," Salzmann said. "Lakeland graduates are absolutely vital to ACUITY's success."

Dale Vos, a Lakeland graduate and district sales manager for Great Lakes Hybrids, delivered the commencement address for the graduate ceremony. Vos received a master of business administration degree from Lakeland in 2012. His daughter, Grace, received her bachelor's degree in psychology with honors on Sunday.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Mon, 02 May 2016 15:45:43 -0500
Lakeland prepares for Sunday’s graduation ceremonies http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/lakeland-prepares-for-sunday-s-graduation-ceremonies http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/lakeland-prepares-for-sunday-s-graduation-ceremonies

Lakeland College will award degrees to more than 750 students on Sunday at the college's 154th commencement.

A total of 764 students will graduate, including 508 undergraduates and 256 graduate students. A graduate student ceremony will be held at 10:30 a.m., with an undergraduate ceremony beginning at 2 p.m., both in the Wehr Center fieldhouse on Lakeland's campus.

Both ceremonies will be streamed live via the internet at http://portal.stretchinternet.com/lc/.

Additional details about the ceremony can be found at http://lakeland.edu/graduation.

This will be the final graduation ceremony as Lakeland College, as the institution will become Lakeland University on July 1.

Lakeland has classes at its main campus in Sheboygan County and through its Evening, Weekend and Online program with seven centers in Wisconsin.

Benjamin M. Salzmann, president and CEO of ACUITY Insurance, which last month was named the second-best place to work in the United States by Fortune magazine, will deliver the commencement address for the undergraduate ceremony.

In addition to being an employer of dozens of Lakeland graduates, the college and ACUITY are partners in a program at Sheboygan South High School that allows South students to take computer science courses that earn both high school and college credit and creates work-based learning opportunities at ACUITY.

ACUITY, rated as A+ by both A.M. Best and Standard & Poor's, has been listed by Ward Benchmarking as one of the Best Run Insurance Companies for each of the past 16 years. ACUITY is one of the most profitable insurers in the nation based on 16 years of financial results, and writes business across 25 states, with $4 billion in assets.

Dale Vos, a Lakeland graduate and district sales manager for Great Lakes Hybrids, will deliver the commencement address for the graduate ceremony. Vos received a master of business administration degree from Lakeland in 2012.

Vos has extensive leadership and business experience and teaches sociology and business courses for Lakeland's Evening, Weekend and Online program. He is a former ordained pastor, division manager of a midsize retail agricultural business, small business owner, consultant for Iowa State University and production engineer.

His daughter, Grace, will receive her bachelor's degree in psychology with honors on Sunday.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:14:38 -0500
70 students featured in Student Art Exhibition http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/70-students-featured-in-student-art-exhibition http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/70-students-featured-in-student-art-exhibition art sample

The works of an estimated 70 students will be featured as part of the 2016 Annual Lakeland Student Art Exhibition, an annual competitive show that features pieces by Lakeland students enrolled in the college's various studio and graphic art classes in the current school year.

A reception and awards ceremony will be held on Friday, April 15, beginning at 4:30 p.m. in the Bradley Fine Arts Building on the Lakeland campus. The show will run through May 25. Attendance at the reception and admittance to the Bradley Gallery are both free and open to the public.

The Bradley Gallery is open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Friday, when the college is in session.

The show will feature more than 500 works in a wide range of media. The works are the best examples of any given assignment in addition to the most advanced course work in which students set his/her own objectives.

art sample

The opening reception features an awards ceremony including Best of Show, second place, third place and several honorable mentions. In addition, there will be a People's Choice Award determined by all those in attendance at the beginning of the reception who will be given time to take in the entire exhibition and cast their ballot for their favorite piece.

Courses represented include Drawing I, II and III, Two Dimensional Design, Three-Dimensional Design, Painting I, II and III, Watercolor I, Printmaking I and II, Digital Page Layout/InDesign, Image Editing/Photoshop, Digital Illustration/Illustrator, Color Theory, Communication Graphics, Typography and Illustration.

Associate Professor of Art Bill Weidner said, "I am especially pleased with the strong body of work in Drawing I, II and III this year. And Printmaking I and II will display some cutting-edge techniques."

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Thu, 14 Apr 2016 13:22:53 -0500
Lakeland College to become Lakeland University on July 1 http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/lakeland-college-to-become-lakeland-university-on-july-1 http://lakeland.edu/Lakeland-News/lakeland-college-to-become-lakeland-university-on-july-1 Lakeland University LU logo Lakeland University Muskies athletic logo

Lakeland College today announced a number of significant changes, which include renaming the institution Lakeland University and changing its academic structure beginning on July 1.

Two new majors and several academic program enhancements are part of the announcement.

They're the most significant changes announced by the school since Lakeland College was created in 1956, said Dan Eck, the institution's president. Lakeland was founded as Mission House College and Seminary in 1862.

"As we mark the 60th anniversary of a major milestone in this institution's history, we're announcing a number of changes that will position Lakeland as a leader in higher education for decades to come," Eck said. "This is more than just a name change. We are responding to student and employer needs and the wave of developments impacting higher education."

The new academic structure merges the college's existing seven academic divisions into three schools – a School of Business & Entrepreneurship; a School of Science, Technology & Education; and a School of Humanities and Fine Arts.

Meg Albrinck has been named Lakeland University's provost, and will be responsible for oversight of all of Lakeland's academic programs. A member of the Lakeland community for 17 years, she has served as the college's vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college since 2008. She also holds the title of professor of literature and writing.

Each school will be led by a dean. Brian Frink, professor of chemistry and physics, has been named dean of the School of Science, Technology & Education. Scott Niederjohn, Charlotte and Walter Kohler Charitable Trust Professor of Business Administration, has been named dean of the School of Business & Entrepreneurship. The dean for the third school has yet to be named.

The School of Science, Technology & Education will house Lakeland's undergraduate majors and minors in aviation, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, criminal justice, computer science, education, exercise science, mathematics, psychology and sport management and leadership and the master of arts in counseling and master of education programs.

The School of Business & Entrepreneurship will house Lakeland's undergraduate programs in business, including accounting, business administration, economics, hospitality management, marketing and specialized administration, and the master of business administration.

The School of Humanities and Fine Arts will house Lakeland's undergraduate majors and minors in art, broad field social studies, communication, English, history, music, religion, Spanish and writing.

Lakeland also announced a number of academic program additions and enhancements, changes that stem from ongoing program assessment that includes feedback from employers and students:

  • Creation of a five-year bachelor's degree/MBA track for highly motivated, goal-oriented students interested in earning both degrees in a shorter timeframe. "For students interested in positions where an advanced degree is desired, this is a great option," Niederjohn said.
  • Creation of a management information systems bachelor's degree, which is pending approval by the Higher Learning Commission. It combines coursework from Lakeland's existing business administration and computer science majors for students looking for leadership roles in technology fields after graduation. "Jobs requiring an MIS degree are frequently ranked at the top of job outlook surveys," Niederjohn said.
  • Expansion of the marketing major with the addition of four emphasis areas: sales management, retail management, digital marketing and graphic arts.
  • Additional real-world experiences for the hospitality management program. Students seeking jobs in hospitality will have opportunities for housekeeping, food and beverage work with Lakeland's partners, The Osthoff in Elkhart Lake, Destination Kohler and Blue Harbor Resort. Students can also learn event planning working on the college's popular Movers & Shakers Gala.
  • Creation of two new concentrations in the MBA program: Human resources management and supply chain management. The HR coursework fully aligns with the Society for Human Resource Management's (SHRM) HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates, which were developed to define the minimum HR content areas that should be studied by HR students at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
  • Creation of a bachelor of fine arts degree in creative writing. The degree, which is pending approval by the Higher Learning Commission, is the only one of its kind in the state. It will prepare students for a variety of careers in the arts, but specifically creative writing, editing and publishing. Graduates will also be well positioned to seek advanced degrees.
  • Offering biochemistry, biology, chemistry, computer science and exercise science majors as bachelor of science degrees. They are currently offered as bachelor of arts degrees.

A number of factors drove the change from college to university, said Eck, including:

  • The fact that, by industry definition, Lakeland is already a university. Lakeland serves students at seven Wisconsin locations and at a very successful branch campus in Tokyo, Japan. Additionally, for decades, Lakeland has offered graduate-level academic programs, and currently has three master's programs – a master of business administration, master of arts in counseling and master of education. "From a divinity school to a college, from a small rural campus to an institution that has students from all over the globe, we have earned the right and the reputation to identify ourselves publically as a university," Eck said.
  • To aid in recruiting, especially overseas. "Internationally, a ‘college' is a technical college or, in some cases, a high school program," Eck said. "International students have been a focus for Lakeland for decades, and this will help expand our reach."
  • To help clear up confusion with other institutions, including neighboring Lakeshore Technical College. "Lakeland University creates a more clear identity for our institution moving forward," Eck said.
  • The name "university" will benefit students after graduation. "There is a prestige in American higher education that comes with being a university that will aid our graduates," Eck said. "It accurately reflects our current reach and the diversity of our offerings. Higher education is experiencing great change right now, and this signifies that we're able to change and evolve as an institution."

Eck said that one Lakeland tradition won't change: "Universities often conjure images of sprawling campuses with thousands of students. I've had people ask me if we plan on becoming a much bigger institution. We do want to grow, but we will always be that tight-knit community that understands and addresses individual student needs.

"Small class sizes, a wide range of student services and being one of Wisconsin's most affordable private institutions are all points of pride for Lakeland, and those will all continue."

Apparel featuring the new LU logos will be sold in Lakeland's Campus Shop beginning the week of April 25, which leads up to graduation on May 1, the final commencement as Lakeland College. Lakeland will also launch a new website on July 1 featuring the college's new name and logos.

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retlichc [AT] lakeland [DOT] edu (Chris Retlich) Featured Lakeland News Mon, 11 Apr 2016 15:55:00 -0500